Bogota, Medillin, Cali…A City is a City is a ? Part 1 of 2

#blogguilt? Yep, six fascinating, challenging weeks exploring Colombia and we’re already across the border in Ecuador (more on that “interesting” experience in Part 2!).

We spent a lot of time in Colombia’s large cities, learning that as beautiful as the surrounding mountains might be, the cities themselves leave a bit to be desired. To be fair, Bogota (8mil), Medillin (4mil), & Cali (4mil) are just rougher versions of many other million plus population cities around the world – traffic is horrendous and diesel/gas fumes reek – walking is not a lot of fun. Until we get city transit issues sorted out and move away from private cars to public, shared & more environmentally sustainable transportation, the world’s largest cities will continue to be increasingly difficult places to live as they grow. (And that’s my quasi-political/social statement for this blog.)

But Colombia’s big cities offer a good look at the country’s history, its art (fantastic), and a peek at how a tourist industry (while not quite in its infancy – hello, Cuba?) is developing. If you’re planning a visit to Colombia and want to do it without a glossy tour company, be aware -you’ll need the following:

Patience – you’ll be taking buses much of the time, and there are generally not set hours for departure. You will go the terminal, search for a suitable bus line (vendors stand about calling destinations), and either find yourself among the first or last to board…and then, only when the bus is FULL will it depart! Along the route, the bus will stop to let passengers off any old place…despite having told you the bus is “direct” (this does NOT mean “non-stop”.) As seats are emptied, the bus will stop along the route to allow others to board, including vendors who offer drinks, fruits, banana chips…and yes, these impromptu snacks can be delicious.

Earplugs – ah, those buses again. Usually, the music will be turned on, loudly, immediately, and constantly throughout the trip, whether 1 hour or 6. Be prepared.

Toilet paper – if you like more than a couple of squares, you’ll be happier if you put a packet of tissues in your pocket before you venture out. You’ll usually pay for the use of the toilet at bus terminals. And, if you’re female, be prepared for lidless toilets…great for the thigh muscles as you attempt to pee without touching the ceramic.

Ok, tips on how to “journeywise” out of the way.

We loved visiting the main plazas in Colombia’s cities – many are named for Simon Bolivar, the “Liberator.” Statues varied from a soldierly and solemn Bolivar to a “Bolivar as Condor” in Manizales, and naked Bolivar on a horse in Pereira…along with your run-of-the-mill busts. The gentleman was everywhere doing good deeds, until he ran into political and financial difficulties and ended his life in exile.

Bolivar Nude - Pereira

Bolivar Nude – Pereira

Museums and outdoor art were also a complete pleasure. From Botero sculptures to murals and graffiti, Colombia (whether on purpose or not) has encouraged a public sharing of exuberant art – it’s everywhere, splashing color along highways, streets, alleys and parks. While most is “art” for art’s sake, there is also plenty of politically motivated art relating to both indigenous peoples and the FARC guerrilla movement. More photos are available on Instagram @tojourneywise and commentary about traveling, organic agriculture and random thoughts on the journey on Twitter @tojourneywise. Enjoy!

Botero Sculpture

Botero Sculpture

Wall Mural Medillin

Wall Mural Medillin

Part 2 coming soon, more on Colombia’s big cities next time…then on to Ecuador!

Chiva Bus - Colombia

Chiva Bus – Colombia

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And We’re Off….Vamanos!

The next stop on our quest for finding “our spot” is South America – specifically Colombia and Ecuador, where many expats have already found wonderful homes. If you’re a regular reader, you’ll know that last year we spent 4 months traversing the U.S. on the same quest.

We’ll be travelling for three months, trying to stay a minimum of a week in each of a number of different cities, including Bogota, Cartagena, Medellin, and Popayan (in Colombia), and Quito and Cuenca, at a minimum (in Ecuador). Along the way we’ll be visiting a number of organic and/or fairtrade agricultural communities; volunteering when we can.

So, logistics? Three months, altitudes ranging from sea level and a Caribbean climate to roughly 9000’ and rather chilly at night. We’ve got one rolling bag (High Sierra) and one small backpack (mine, Patagonia) apiece, which we hope will get lighter as we go along, giving up old paperbacks, some small gifts we brought along, and discarding clothing along the way. It’s said “a picture is worth a thousand words,” and though I’m not convinced, here are a couple of pics of the packing process:

All I'm taking, except the raincoat.

All I’m taking, except the raincoat.


It Fit, with lots of rolling!

It Fit, with lots of rolling!


Moments from Departure

Moments from Departure

I’ve worked hard at recalling Spanish from a long ago stint as an exchange student in Ecuador (yay, AFS!) courtesy of an app called “Duolingo.” And, we have 4 days of 2-3 hour Spanish lessons beginning the morning of our arrival. Don’t expect any blogging in Spanish though I may toss in the occasional “palabra” so you know I’m working on it!

The first two nights we’ll be at a small B&B called Churro de Queveda, and then we move to an airbnb in the same neighborhood of Candelaria, the historic center of Bogota. Nope, Bogota is not a candidate for our spot, but it is a great place to acclimate, learn a bit of Spanish, and enjoy some good food and culture before we move on. And with that, Buenos Noches de Colombia…

View from Churro de Queveda

View from Churro de Queveda

2015 and On the Road Again…

In 2014, we embarked on a journey to explore the world through the lens of organic agriculture, fair trade, small & local businesses (primarily food, beverage & books!). The ultimate goal is to find a spot that seems right for the next chapter, whether in the U.S. or abroad. And so, we’re about to set off again, this time for South America. Stay tuned…

We live in a wonderful world that is full of beauty, charm and adventure. There is no end to the adventures we can have if only we seek them with our eyes open.          Jawaharlal Nehru

Indian Umbrellas

Indian Umbrellas

What’s Brewing? So Very Much!

Old Bust Head Brewery

Old Bust Head Brewery

This 13,000 mile 100 day plus journey has prompted one question more than any other – how are CW and I managing to spend so much time together, and still be together?  After 32 years of marriage when we rarely spent more than two full weeks together, we’re still smiling (at each other!) after four months of travel, in a car (…talk about close quarters!) If you’re contemplating anything like what we’ve just accomplished, it’s worth considering how you really prefer to spend your time, and agreeing on some simple ways to make sure you get enough “me” time – however you define it.  (This blog eventually comes round to lots of fun info about beer, brewing and beverages, so bear with me!)

Cooking with Spent Grain - Pizza Crust!

Cooking with Spent Grain – Pizza Crust!

We’re not oblivious to the pitfalls of travelling.  In fact, we think one of the greatest indicators of a potentially successful partnership is surviving the challenges of travelling together.  Those challenges are many and I’ll address those in a dedicated blog – but for now, I want to explore one of the most important ones for me:

Constant togetherness…

 

The Roasterie - So Good!

The Roasterie – So Good!

Boulevard Brewing - Around the Corner

Boulevard Brewing – Around the Corner

On this journeywise adventure, we knew from experience that a key strategy would be to find ways to have some occasional hours (ok, frequent hours) apart, to be on our own or at our separate pursuits.  And since we’re both very comfortable in new places (and really, nowhere in the U.S. was going to feel as strange as some of the other places we’ve been) we knew it would just take a little planning to engineer a few hours on our own every other day or so.

Evans Bros. Coffee - Idaho

Evans Bros. Coffee – Idaho

What helps immensely is that we’ve both created portable businesses: CW as what one of his brewery friends so aptly calls “an itinerant malt peddler,” and me, as a consultant and advisor to food and beverage startups in the organic, fair trade and natural sphere.  Charley does best with in-person calls on breweries, while I can manage primarily with phone, Skype, and email, though personal meetings are great when they can happen.  Our work means engaging with fun and interesting people who are working to nourish the world!

We didn’t consciously start our four-month long journey with a plan for how to incorporate independent time – but we learned quickly that CW’s most successful brewery visits would often take an hour or more, and if I could find a local coffee shop, farm market, or natural grocery to explore for at the very least an hour (and two hours was not at all a bad thing, I came to learn) then we’d both have a better time, with no anxiety for me over “when is he going to get back?!” nor CW worrying that I was getting antsy just when he was about to present the malts and whiskies, and getting to taste stellar beers, all with the point of actually leaving a sample of Copper Fox malt behind!

Tasting Brews Across the USA

Tasting Brews Across the USA

It’s far past time to give CW credit for a lot of the fun and exploring we’ve had on this journey.  Charley’s work with Copper Fox Distillery  http://www.copperfox.biz/index/ in Sperryville, Virginia has taken us (well, him) to over 60 craft breweries in 22 states and 4 Canadian provinces over the past 4 months, as he introduced brewers to the Distillery’s hand crafted, Virginia-grown barley malts.

We started the trip with about 100 pounds of the specialty smoked malts in the back of the car (along with our suitcases and camping gear), and picked up another 30 pounds (plus fresh bottles of the two whiskies) on the West Coast.  Although I’m now used to the slightly yeasty, warm-bread smell of sacks of the specialty malts wafting about in the car, I was happy that we left Boston for home having completely depleted the malt inventory!  CW’s pretty excited about that as well, as it means that across the U.S. and Canada, small and mid-sized craft breweries—now well over 30–are experimenting and creating new beers with Copper Fox’s apple and cherry wood smoked malt, and mesquite smoked malt.   Results of this summer’s visits already include brews on tap or soon on tap at Old Bust Head Brewing, in Warrenton, VA  http://www.oldbusthead.com/  Firehouse Brewing, in Rapid City, SD  http://www.firehousebrewing.com/  Sawtooth Brewing, in Ketchum, ID  http://sawtoothbrewery.com/         The Grizzly Paw Brewing Company, in Canmore, Alberta (near Banff)  http://www.thegrizzlypaw.com/      and The Raw Deal/Real Deal Brewing, in Menomanie, WI  http://www.rawdeal-wi.com/  .   If you happen to be nearby any of these, you can enjoy a brew with a Copper Fox smoked malt as a key ingredient, and vicariously join our  “journeywise!”

Mural in Detroit

Mural in Detroit

There’s a bit more of the trip to catch up on, but we’ve now arrived back in Philadelphia, and midst the unpacking, sorting, and oh yes, planning the next trip, I’m behind my optimistic blogging schedule.  Soon to come – what did we learn and what’s next?  Stay tuned!

Along the Lewis & Clark Trail…

The only place we’ve stayed more than one night so far is back in Lexington, Virginia, and that’s not ideal – two nights in one place is better than one!  But, we’re getting better at taking the minimum amount of “stuff” into each hotel room (no camping yet!) to make a quick start in the morning.  We’d be taking this early part of the journey much slower, but have a “Boise by May 29” goal, and so are really making tracks across country;  still finding time to meander and pause at unanticipated  roadside treasures…mostly natural food stores, coffee shops, singular restaurants, brew pubs!

From Kansas City, the Corps of Discovery made its arduous way upstream – by poling or pulling (known as cordelling) the 55’ keelboat.  It took them a month to reach a spot near Council Bluffs, Iowa.  We drove to and past Council Bluffs from St. Charles in a day.

Through Iowa

Through Iowa

Council Bluffs was named for the Expedition’s first encounter with Native Americans.  We stopped at a lovely overlook on a bluff above the Missouri, imagining the men struggling against the current, and camping just across the river from where we sat.

We made a quick stop in Sioux City, Iowa, seeking coffee and internet access –two important resources we try to consult every other day or so.  We don’t have advance reservations from here on, and so rely on Yelp, TripAdvisor and Priceline, which led us this day to charming Yankton, South Dakota. After dinner at “El Tapatio,” we headed to another important resource:  Walmart – to provision for camping…and where the magazine selection was most interesting.

Yankton Dinner

Yankton Dinner

Magazines

Before striking out westward to Rapid City, South Dakota, we walked across Yankton’s restored Meridian Bridge to Nebraska.

Meridian Bridge, Yankton, SD

Meridian Bridge, Yankton, SD

 

Hello South Dakota!

Hello South Dakota!

The scenery has been beautiful in ever changing ways, and though we won’t choose to live in the “flatlands,” there is something awesome about the Great Plains, the rolling hills and wide skies – how much of it Woodie Guthrie had seen when he composed This Land is Your Land, I’m not sure, but the landscape we’re passing through has kept me mindful of the power of the land and its meaning – especially as we celebrate, and remember, on Memorial Day.

 

4 Months, 2 People, 1 Car, a Tent & a Plan…

We left Bethesda, MD yesterday and began a 4-month odyssey across the U.S. and British Columbia, and back to the east coast.  CW will be continuing his “maltrepreneurial” activities, introducing craft brewers across the country to his hand-crafted smoked malts from a small distillery in Virginia; I’m focused on finding farm to table restaurants and diners, local food production including coffee, chocolate, cheese & cider (the 4 “C’s!”), and oh, let’s add Kombucha even though it starts with a K, organic agriculture, unusual museums and experiencing the differences in climate and culture as we travel.

We’re also on a mission to explore communities to which we might someday move – there’s not really a checklist, but we are looking for access to hiking and the outdoors, culture and cultural diversity, a sustainable economy and food system, community, education & health care, among others.  “Climate” is a parameter on which we still have some differences.

Day 1 – we drove not far, from Maryland to Charlottesville, Virginia though the urban density of the greater Washington DC area, and into the gorgeous, verdant, rolling hills of Virginia horse country.  The pace will pick up soon, but these first few days are focused on Virginia breweries and Civil War sesquicentennial activities at the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) for the May 1864 Battle of New Market, in which CW’s great-grandfather, John S. Wise, participated as a VMI Cadet.

Dinner was at The Local, sourcing ingredients from nearby farms and engaging local craftspeople to create a rustic, comfortable restaurant with a balcony looking over the tiny village of Belmont.  http://thelocal-cville.com/  The dinner, from the fried green tomato and burrata salad, to the house-made fettucine and mushroom ragout, to the incredible peanut butter brownie sundae, was a rewarding end to day one.  Figuring out how to exercise on the road and work off the local meals we plan to enjoy is the next challenge!

 

Virginia Horse Country

Virginia Horse Country

Unexpected - Georgia O'Keefe Lived Here

Unexpected – Georgia O’Keefe Lived Here

Let’s Sell the House!

In the aftermath of the wonderful trip to India, CW and I decided to follow through with an idea we’d been toying with for a year or so…selling the house, downsizing, packing the tent and heading west and back, with a goal of exploring possible locations for our next home.  Two days after getting back, and still a bit jet-lagged, we found an agent and began rapid work to prep the house for sale.  We were more exhausted by this than we could have imagined – up and down the stairs hundreds of times, making decisions about belongings – keep, store, donate, trash? Packing a household of thirty years of furniture, artwork, dishes, glasses and goblets, family heirlooms, and books, many many books, on our own, instead of enjoying the luxury of a company move – now that I’ve done it, don’t plan on a repeat.  Fatigue was also psychological, even though this was a much discussed and well-planned move.

Within 8 weeks of getting back from India, we turned the keys to our house over to new owners and experienced an unexpected sense of weightlessness (well, almost) – no more lawn to mow, house repairs to undertake, empty rooms to dust.  Instead, we have a small, urban apartment in Philadelphia which we can leave by simply locking the door, and to which we can return when wanderlust is sated. 

The next journey will be North America – exploring a number of cities that beckon as locations for our next home, even though that may not be for a few years.  What’s important?  Nature, cultural diversity, a sustainable economy, appreciation for local food, a supportive community, education, health care…among other things!  And, I’ll be sharing how we “journeywise” – join us for the drive!  We’re on our way…

Sweet House

Sweet House

Favorite Spot...

Favorite Spot…

4 Months, 1 Car, & Adventure!

4 Months, 1 Car, & Adventure!

Kerala Idyll

The drive to the backwaters of Kerala in Kumarakom was, yes, long! But in part fascinating, as we drove through a small village celebrating a temple festival, and traffic came to a stop as two parades converged from opposite directions on the little more than one-lane road. There were a few police officers standing around waving what we’ve been calling “swagger sticks.” But the traffic didn’t seem to pay much attention at all, and it was to the peril of the parade participants and the bystanders as buses, log trucks, tuktuks and cars tried to wend their way along the route. It took us at least an hour to go about 2 miles – and that after we got out of the car and walked along the parade route. Why sit (even in the cool car) when we could experience the excitement of a village parade? We probably added an element of novelty to the festivities as well!

Young men were carrying enormous pyramid-shaped wooden frames covered with multi-colored foil flowers – in a sort of wooden yoke across their shoulders. As the band of flutes and drums played, the men started twirling, until they got dizzy and passed the contraption to someone else.

Village Parade

Village Parade

We eventually made it to the houseboat dock, (after an amusing elephant in a truck scene and an extraordinary sighting of over 20 eagles soaring over prawn fishing boats) where many traditional boats, known as Kettuvallam, were tied up. The hand-off to our crew of two was rather lackadaisical, and they didn’t speak much English – in a way this was fine as CW and I could just chat and ponder the view instead of asking the unending questions we’ve had throughout the trip. Our 60’ long boat had an open, but covered sitting/dining area with a built in bench running along the side of the boat where I enjoyed reclining and watching the scenery pass by. We had a small bedroom with tiny combined toilet/shower area (this is typical), and there was a kitchen and crew area in the back of the boat. We were really surprised by how many houseboats there were; it felt a bit like “houseboats on parade,” as you can see in the photo.

Houseboats on Parade

Houseboats on Parade


Afternoon Banana Fritters and Coffee

Afternoon Banana Fritters and Coffee


Backwaters Houseboat

Backwaters Houseboat

A backwaters overnight trip is probably not for anyone who needs a lot of movement or exercise! We spent a couple of hours the first day, including the late lunch, cruising the smaller canals and out into Lake Vembanad. There’s not much to do but watch what’s happening on shore and on the water – and it is beautiful and fascinating – village life on the water; women doing laundry by stepping down into the water on old stone stairs, slapping the laundry rhythmically against the side of the steps; children were swimming, old men were fishing, and long dragon-prowed boats were delivering huge sacks of the rice harvested from the paddies all along the back waters. And it was hot. 35 c or 95 F, and humid – so when the boat wasn’t cruising, the air was still, warm and moist, recalling my least favorite part of living in Singapore.

Backwaters of Kerala

Backwaters of Kerala

It was disappointing, after having seen all the quiet backwaters and the still lake, to find that we were going to dock and spend the night back at the busy, noisy boat mooring area. (Nothing I’d read indicated that we wouldn’t be somewhere away from civilization for the overnight part…) There was air-conditioning in the bedroom, the sound of which helped to mute music and conversation from neighboring boats – only a foot or two away. After breakfast, we cruised again for an hour and then returned to the dock to continue our journey by car to another part of the backwaters on Lake Vembanad, near the town of Kumarakom.

At the Abad Whispering Sands, we had our first true “resort” experience in India. Our cool, large and simple room overlooked the lake, hammocks suspended under the coconut trees, and sweetly, a number of Indian honeymoon couples. But it was only the international guests who enjoyed the “yoga in the pool.”

Pool Yoga

Pool Yoga

The big adventure for this brief resort stay was a long walk along one of the tiny lanes trying to find a coffee shop, and hopping into a convenient tuktuk to ride into the town of Kumarakom, where we had our first seafood in India at the “Hotel Dubai.” Then into a local sweet shop/bakery where we found cardamom chai and a pastry to celebrate this “non-birthday” for Leap Year baby CW.

Kumarakom Canal

Kumarakom Canal

From the backwaters we drove to Cochin (Kochi), a wonderful old Kerala city that between the 16th to 19th centuries was occupied by the Portuguese, Dutch and British. We stayed at the Koder House in Fort Kochi (the old city), a 200-year old home built by an early Jewish family; various early maharajahs had been both tolerant of and welcoming to other religions, and many Jews settled in Cochin from the 1500’s on – though now, only 7 Jewish residents live in the old city. We visited the lovely and poignant Jewish Synagogue, and strolled the lanes of what is commonly known as “Jew Town.” After the creation of the state of Israel, most Cochin Jews emigrated, leaving behind lovely old homes, and a way of life that had existed in Cochin for hundreds of years.

Koder House

Koder House


Koder House Guest Room

Koder House Guest Room

Cochin is one of my favorite stops on the trip – the history, the culture, the variety of people and ways of life were dazzling. Cochin is famous for its “Chinese Fishing Nets,” of which only a dozen or so remain in the old city. By getting up early in the morning, my stroll on the seaside promenade was quiet, except for the men working the fishing nets, lowering them via lines of suspended small boulders, letting the nets rest in the water for about five minutes, and then levering the huge nets back up with their catch. Stall owners hovered nearby waiting to purchase the fresh catch – and I’m sure we ate some of it later in the day.

Cochin Fishing Nets

Cochin Fishing Nets

We reluctantly left Cochin and flew across southern India to Chennai, driving south to the old French colony (until the 1960’s) of Pondicherry (Puducherry, these days.) This was a real treat, and more about that soon. As I write, we are sitting in a small rooftop restaurant in Mamallapuram, south of Chennai, preparing for our midnight drive to the airport for a 4am flight to London and home, so this blog will be posted after return and a day or two of jet lag. Namaste, and wishing you safe travels and to journeywise.

JourneyWise Note:

Other than the real “cold,” we haven’t been sick or had digestive problems…Here are some of the precautions we’ve taken: (some may seem silly, but hey, it’s worked!)

Teeth: NEVER used anything but bottled water, to wet the brush, rinse the mouth, clean the toothbrush…

Eyes: I wear contact lenses so, after cleaning lenses with solution, ALWAYS rinsed with bottled water, and after removing from case, I rinsed the case with bottled, NOT tap, water.

Drinking: ALWAYS drank bottled water, not even the purified and filtered water offered at some hotels and restaurants. We did often have masala chai and coffee from stalls, and were pretty sure the water was safely boiled…and we carried personal water bottles everywhere and refilled them from the large bottles of water we bought to keep in the car.

Cleanliness: Even though I’m not a fan of using antiseptic lotions and wipes at home, they were always by my side in India. I had a small generic bottle of antiseptic spray that I used on my hands frequently, and antiseptic wipes that I’d use to clean my face, neck and arms after any hot, sweaty activity – which was pretty much everything we did except in the highlands. Otherwise, we either did small bits of laundry in the hotel sink or had pieces sent out – laundry prices were incredibly cheap (10 rupees for undergarments, 20 for a shirt. 100 rupees approx. $1.60) And, we were a little dirty and a little smelly some of the time!

The JourneyWise India Adventure

Enough about London, fun though it was! We’ve been in India for five days, jet lag is over, and it’s time to share! What an incredible sensory overload it’s been so far. Here’s a map (thank you, Google maps)that represents the northern, 12 day part of the journey. We used our trusty old Times Atlas of the World and Google maps simultaneously to plan the trip, appreciating how old tech (paper) and new tech worked so well together.

We’re leaving beautiful Jaipur tomorrow for a long drive to Jodphur, and will catch up on what’s happened before that in the next blog or two. In the meantime, here’s the plan:

JourneyWise through Rajasthan

JourneyWise through Rajasthan

My nice placemarkers didn’t move over with the map (still working on my blogging knowledge!) so, starting with “A” we’re going from Delhi to Agra to Jaipur to Jodphur to Jaisalmer to Manvar to Udaipur, then fly to Bangalore for the second part of the journey. Our funny, smart and extremely good driver, Raj, has introduced us to the concept of the “Indian 1/2 hour” – think, “one hour,” so we’re sincerely hoping that the planned 8 hour drive tomorrow doesn’t get adjusted too much, and by too many hours!

London Reprise

Let’s go back to London just once before focusing on its former “jewel in the crown,” and recap some of the highlights of this trip.

We revisited the National Portrait Gallery, trying to put faces to the many kings and queens, went again to the Tate Modern, which is always a wonderful extravaganza of contemporary and sometimes challenging art, and briefly visited the Seven Dials area, mostly to walk in to tiny Neal’s Yard Dairy, featuring fantastic cheeses from all around the British Isles – and to purchase tastes of various blues, and a sliver of Stinking Bishop…enjoyed after making dinner at our friend’s flat, while watching live womens’ rugby – what a treat!

New explorations took us for a walk over the Millenium Bridge; for a city boat commute from London Bridge Pier to Greenwich, where we admired the gorgeous tea clipper Cutty Sark, which hauled tea from China to England in the late 1800’s; and the National Maritime Museum, which had a wonderful exhibit of JW Turner maritime paintings and a collection of his sketch books. Borough Market was another treat, with stalls of vegetables, cheeses, breads, prepared foods and craft soaps (of course!)

Travelling around London is easy – buy an Oyster Pass which you scan entering and leaving the underground or bus. Topping up is easy too and maps are on the trains and in the stations, including magnified street maps as you depart the station. Stand in front for a few minutes to orient yourself and you’’ll be more at ease when you get above ground. Time to write about India…but enjoy these few photos, and I’ll upload a gallery of London pics when I’ve figured out how to do that!

Neal's Yard Dairy "Blues"

Neal’s Yard Dairy “Blues”

Tea Clipper Cutty Sark

Tea Clipper Cutty Sark

Double Decker Bike Rack

Double Decker Bike Rack